Showing posts with label Young Catholic Adults. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Young Catholic Adults. Show all posts

Monday, 8 October 2018

NLM Interview with Archbishop Sample: Why Young People Are Attracted to Traditional Liturgy

H/t to http://www.newliturgicalmovement.org/:-


"NLM is pleased to present the following transcription of an interview conducted by Julian Kwasniewski with the Most Reverend Alexander K. Sample, Archbishop of Portland, in connection with the Sacred Liturgy Conference in Salem, Oregon, June 27–30, 2018. Much of what his Excellency says is highly pertinent to the Youth Synod taking place at the Vatican this month. This interview is published here for the first time.



Celebrating a pontifical Mass in Rolduc
JK: How would you relate this experience of Eucharistic adoration to your episcopal motto: Vultum Christi Contemplari. What does your motto tell us about what you just said?

AS: I took my motto from the writings of St. John Paul II, who I consider my patron saint, quite honestly. I have no connection to him by name, but I really do consider him my patron saint now. He has been a great inspiration to me; I’m not sure I would be a priest today if it was not for him.

This idea of contemplating Christ’s face was something that John Paul II wrote a lot about. In Novo Millenio Ineunte, he recalls the scene in the Gospels where the Greeks come to Philip and they say, “We want to see Jesus.” The Holy Father picks up on that idea and says that this question, “we want to see Jesus,” is a question that is really in the heart of every person in the world today. Even if they don’t know it, they want to see the face of Jesus. He said they don’t want Christians just to talk about Christ — the world wants us to show them Christ. That’s our job: to let the light of Christ’s face shine before the generations of the new millennium. But, he goes on to say, our task would be hopelessly inadequate had we not first contemplated His face.

So he said we must contemplate the face of Christ. We must know Him intimately and deeply, we must cultivate that close personal relationship with the Lord, in order for us to show Him to the world. It’s very close to my own spirituality of prayer and being in the presence of the Blessed Sacrament and just contemplating Christ’s presence in His Face. This is where my motto came from.

Later, in his last encyclical, Ecclesia Dei Eucharistia, John Paul II put it very bluntly: This is the task that I have set before the Church at the beginning of the new millennium, Vultum Christi contemplatri, to contemplate the face of Christ. And then he also speaks of the Marian dimension which he develops in his pastoral letter on the Rosary, that we contemplate the Face of Christ through Mary in the praying of the Rosary.

JK: Do you think the pope’s emphasis on contemplation is related to the problem of activism in our times?

AS: Yes. John Paul II is saying, “Church: This is your task. To first contemplate the face of Christ ourselves so that we may then let it shine before the nations.” Since we cannot give to the world what we do not have, we must first know Christ before we bring Him to others. For a Catholic in the world (not a contemplative religious), there must be a balance between contemplation and work, knowing Christ deeply and intimately, adoring him in prayer, in order for one to effectively carry on the apostolic works of the Church.


JK: It seems that many young people these days are rediscovering contemplation and an ability to give themselves joyfully to Christ through loving the Latin Mass and the old liturgical prayer of the Church.

AS: That’s a very good point, and it’s a point I made in the homily I gave at the Solemn Pontifical Mass at the National Shrine in Washington D.C. You know, the Church was filled with young people!

A lot of times, priests expect that if you go to a Traditional Latin Mass according to the 1962 missal, the church will be filled with grey hair, old people filled with nostalgia for days gone by, and that they have a sort of emotional attachment to the liturgy they grew up with.

But more and more, the majority of the people in the church at these masses are people who never lived during the time when this was the ordinary liturgy, that is, before the Council. If you are under a certain age (and that age is getting higher and higher), you never experienced this liturgy growing up. And yet young people — which is something Pope Benedict XVI said in his letter to the world’s bishops when he issued Summorum Pontificum — have discovered this [form] too, and have found it very spiritually nourishing and satisfying. They have come to love and appreciate it.

That is amazing to me: young people who have never experienced this growing up in the postconciliar Church, with the Ordinary Form (sometimes celebrated well, sometimes very poorly with all kinds of aberrations and abuses), have still discovered the Latin Mass and are attracted to it.

JK: What, in your view, accounts for that attraction?

AS: I would say its beauty, its solemnity, the sense of transcendence, of mystery. Not mystery in the sense of “Oh, we don’t know what’s going on,” but rather, that there is a mysterium tremendum celebrated here, a tremendous mystery. The liturgy in the old rite really conveys the essential nature and meaning of the Mass, which is to represent the once-for-all sacrifice of Christ which he offered on the Cross and now sacramentally, in an unbloody manner, in the Holy Mass.

I think young people are drawn to it because it feeds a spiritual need that they have. There is something to this form of the liturgy, in and of itself, that speaks to the heart of youth. Young people will continue to discover this, and they will be the ones who carry forward the Extraordinary Form when the older generation goes to their reward. Certainly this will be young people of your generation, but ... I’m 57. I was baptized in the old rite, but by the time I was aware and cognizant of Mass, we had already come to the new liturgy. So everybody younger than me has no experience really of this liturgy. Anyone under my age could be considered “young” in discovering this beautiful liturgy!


JK: Your Excellency, what would you say is the most important element of tradition for the Catholic youth to hold and cherish at this time?

AS: I think what young people need to do first is to discover — and many have — the Church’s tradition. Many young people have been deprived, in a certain way, of our Catholic heritage, of the great tradition which is ours in the Catholic Church. I know for myself I feel I was ... I don’t want to say cheated because that sounds like someone did it intentionally out of ill will for me ... but I feel like I was deprived of real teaching and appreciation and contact with my Catholic culture and my Catholic tradition and where we come from. I lived in and grew up in an age when there was this attitude that the Church had, in some way, hit a reset button at Vatican II, and that we could let go of all the past, as if the Church needed a new beginning and a fresh start.

You are far too young to have lived through that experience, and you are very blessed to live in the time that you do, because there was nothing like this for me when I was growing up. I grew up in a time when all of those things in the past had to be cast aside. Even something as simple as the Rosary, it was kind of discouraged — or if not discouraged, it was certainly not encouraged. I never saw Eucharistic Exposition and Benediction until I was a college student. I never knew such a thing existed. I grew up when there was a lot of experimentation with the Mass, always trying to make it “fresh and new.” There was a period of time growing up when you came to Mass on Sunday, and you just didn’t know what was going to happen next! The changes were coming so fast, and not just changes but experimentation and aberrations. So I was deprived of any contact with my tradition; I discovered it, on my own, as a college student.

JK: Was the liturgy the only area in which you felt deprived of contact with tradition, or are you speaking more broadly?

AS: In ‘tradition’ I would certainly also include the teachings of the Church that I never learned. I never understood what the Mass was — and I went to 12 years of Catholic school. If you has asked me what the Mass meant, I would probably have told you that it was a reenactment of the Last Supper, the last meal which Jesus shared with His disciples and in which He gave them His Body and Blood ... which is part of the truth. But the idea that the Mass was in any way a sacramental re-presentation of the paschal mystery, that Christ’s sacrifice on Calvary was made truly, sacramentally present at the altar — and that it is an altar, and not just a table! — that would have been a foreign idea to me.

So certainly part of the tradition is that young people need to be deeply in touch with the Faith, what we believe, what the Catechism teaches. Young people must not take it for granted that what they have received in education (whether in a Catholic school or a religious education program) is an adequate formation in the Faith. They need to really delve into the teachings of the Church, the Catechism, they need to read good, solid books and articles, and other media forms, whether internet or movies. So that is part of it.

But of course, a big part of our tradition is our liturgical tradition. It’s in our DNA — and that’s why many are attracted to the traditional forms of the liturgy — because it’s in our Catholic DNA. Young people need to acquaint themselves with the richer, deeper tradition. Vatican II did not hit a reset button. Although, perhaps, the tradition needed to be renewed and refreshed, it never was meant to be destroyed or cast aside.

Pontifical Mass at Rolduc

JK: Would you put sacred music into this category, too?

AS: The rich liturgical tradition of the Church includes her sacred music. We don’t have to have pop music at Mass. The first time I heard Gregorian chant was when I was a college student. I’d never heard of chant before. When I heard it in a music appreciation class at a secular university, I hadn’t a clue what it meant, but it instantly spoke to my heart—instantly. The first time I heard it I was moved, really moved. So there is this rich liturgical, sacred music tradition that we need to recapture, recover, that young people need to learn about.

Moreover, we should all have devotions in our life. Devotions extend what the liturgy begins. Things like the Rosary, the chaplet of Divine Mercy, Eucharistic Adoration, other devotions to the Blessed Virgin, having favorite saints, patron saints that you pray to, Stations of the Cross…All these rich parts of our Catholic devotional tradition feed the life of faith and extend what we experience in the sacred liturgy, but also lead us back to it.

JK: Do you have any additional advice for young traditional Catholics trying to recover their tradition? 

AS: I’d say there is a tendency sometimes to see these things — doctrine, liturgy, devotions — in opposition to things like works of charity, works of mercy. I would emphasize that we must not get to a place where all we are concerned about is being of right doctrine (orthodoxy), having right liturgy (orthopraxy), good sacred music, that we are doing all the right devotions. If we are not doing works of mercy, the corporal and spiritual works of mercy, if we are not taking care of the poor and disadvantaged, then we are not living fully our Catholic faith. That’s part of our tradition too!

I think traditional-minded Catholics should not let, perhaps, the more liberal elements in the church co-opt the works of justice and mercy as being “something of the new Church.” Catholics have always been steeped in the corporal and spiritual works of mercy. The Church of the ages is the one that built hospitals and took care of the sick and the poor and the dying, built schools to educate poor children without opportunities.

The works of justice and mercy are also very much a part of our tradition, and I would caution young people not to get so focused on the other elements we spoke of that they forget that Jesus teaches us to love, to serve those who are in need. Remember the parable He gives us on the Last Judgment, when he separates the sheep from the goats. He does not separate them based on whether they are praying the traditional prayers or not. He separates them based on “when I was hungry did you feed me, when I was thirsty did you give me to drink, when I was homeless, did you shelter me, when I was sick and in prison did you visit me?” This is the basis of the judgment… it’s not an either/or!

This is a tendency I see: if you are a “progressive Catholic,” you are all about the social justice issues, taking care of the poor, working for justice and everything, but your liturgical worship tends to be a bit off and maybe you reject other moral teachings of the Church, while sometimes traditionally-minded Catholics are characterized as being all about the Mass, and right worship, right music, right devotions, the right vestments, orthodox teaching, and don’t care so much about the poor and works of mercy.

We’ve got to pull this together: it is not an either/or, it is a both/and in the Church. The works of mercy go back to the apostolic times, go back to the Acts of the Apostles; as St. Paul says, we must always take care of the poor. This is deeply traditional in our Church."

Archbishop Sample with prison inmates


Thursday, 13 July 2017

100th Anniversary of Fatima Apparitions – 13 July 1917: HELL IS REAL



From wdtprs:-

"Today is the 100th anniversary of Our Lady’s appearance at Fatima to the three seers on 13 July.
What happened?

The father of Jacinta and Francisco said that when the 13 July apparition began, a small grayish cloud hovered over the holm oak tree, the sunlight diminished, and a cool breeze came up even though it was summer. He heard something like flies inside a jug. The seers saw a glare of light. and then saw Mary over the tree.
The dialogue of Mary and Lucia went:
Lucia: What does Your Grace wish of me?
Our Lady: I want you to come here on the thirteenth of next month and to continue to pray the Rosary every day in honor of Our Lady of the Rosary, in order to obtain peace for the world and the end of the war, for she alone can be of any avail.
Lucia: I would like to ask you to tell us who you are and to perform a miracle so everyone will believe that Your Grace appears to us.
Our Lady: Continue to come here every month. In October, I will tell you who I am and what I wish, and I will perform a miracle that everyone shall see so as to believe.
Lucia then made a number of requests for conversions, cures, and other graces. Our Lady recommended the constant recitation of the rosary; thus they would obtain those graces during the year.
Then she went on: “Sacrifice yourselves for sinners and say many times, especially when you make a sacrifice, ‘O Jesus, this is for love of Thee, for the conversion of sinners, and in reparation for the sins committed against the Immaculate Heart of Mary.’
This is the apparition in which Mary showed the children a vision of Hell:
Lucia wrote:
“Our Lady showed us a great sea of fire which seemed to be under the earth. Plunged in this fire were demons and souls in human form, like transparent burning embers, all blackened or burnished bronze, floating about in the conflagration, now raised into the air by the flames that issued from within themselves together with great clouds of smoke, now falling back on every side like sparks in a huge fire, without weight or equilibrium, and amid shrieks and groans of pain and despair, which horrified us and made us tremble with fear. The demons could be distinguished by their terrifying and repulsive likeness to frightful and unknown animals, all black and transparent. This vision lasted but an instant. How can we ever be grateful enough to our kind heavenly Mother, who had already prepared us by promising, in the first Apparition, to take us to heaven. Otherwise, I think we would have died of fear and terror.”
After that Mary said to them, according to Lucia:
“You have seen hell where the souls of poor sinners go. To save them, God wishes to establish in the world devotion to my Immaculate Heart. If what I say to you is done, many souls will be saved and there will be peace. The war is going to end: but if people do not cease offending God, a worse one will break out during the Pontificate of Pius XI. [WWII] When you see a night illumined by an unknown light, [In January 1938 there was a massive Aurora Borealis] know that this is the great sign given you by God that He is about to punish the world for its crimes, by means of war, famine, and persecutions of the Church and of the Holy Father. To prevent this, I shall come to ask for the consecration of Russia to my Immaculate Heart, and the Communion of reparation on the First Saturdays. [1st Saturday Devotion!] If my requests are heeded, Russia will be converted, and there will be peace; if not, she will spread her errors throughout the world, causing wars and persecutions of the Church. The good will be martyred; the Holy Father will have much to suffer; various nations will be annihilated. In the end, my Immaculate Heart will triumph. The Holy Father will consecrate Russia to me, and she shall be converted, and a period of peace will be granted to the world. In Portugal, the dogma of the faith will always be preserved, etc. …”
Consider your sins committed and sins of omission.
Consider the state of the Church and nation.
Consider what YOUR role is according to your state of life.
Consider making some changes in your prayer life and works of mercy.

GO TO CONFESSION!"

Tag: Our Lady of Fatima, Hell, Young Catholic Adults, GO TO CONFESSSION!

Monday, 18 May 2015

YCA National Weekend at Aylesford - 31st Oct 1st Nov 2015. Bookings Now Being Taken


2015 Theme: “One day, through the Rosary and the Scapular, Our Lady will save the world.”
Attributed to Saint Dominic.

YCA National Weekend at Aylesford -in Association with the Scola Gregoriana of Cambridge

Set in the heart of Kent, England, The Friars - Aylesford Priory - is an ancient religious house of the Order of Carmelites dating back to the 13th Century. Over the centuries and now today The Friars has become the destination for thousands of visitors. Fr. Gregory Pearson and noted author Donel Foley will be giving talks.

At the 2015 Young Catholic Adult Weekend Pilgrimage, there will be:

  • Sung/High Masses, 
  • Gregorian Chant Workshops, 
  • Talks, 
  • Rosaries, 
  • Confessions, 
  • Marian Procession, 
  • Socials.

To book on to the weekend please go to the automated booking system at:- 

 
For more details please see:- http://www.youngcatholicadults.co.uk/events.htm .
*Please note Aylesford Priory have a booking deadline of 18th September, otherwise they reserve the right to release rooms for sale to other guests as required. Also they do not allow last minute refunds so  any non-arrivals and/or cancellations made up to 3 days before the event will be non-refundable.



Sunday, 10 March 2013

YCA National St. John Wall Harvington Pilgrimage - Sunday 2nd June 2013






Timetable

11:30-12:00pm Arrival
12:00pm-1:20pm Guided Tour of the House
1:20pm-2:00pm – Lunch (packed lunch)
2:00-3:00pm – Free Time (chance to look at the grounds)
3:00pm Low/Sung Mass in the Parish Church (just outside the Hall)

Entrance Fees and How to Book

Inclusive Ticket (Hall, Malt House Visitor Centre & Gardens)
Adults: £8.00. Please send a deposit of £5 (cheque or cash) to D. Barker, 126 Curlew Road, Abbeydale, Gloucester, Glos. GL4 4TD.

How to get here

The Hall’s post code is: DY10 4LR.
Harvington Hall, Harvington, Kidderminster, Worcestershire DY10 4LR
The Hall is situated three miles south-east of Kidderminster, about half a mile east of the A450 Birmingham to Worcester road and about half-a-mile north of the A448 from Kidderminster to Bromsgrove. Grid. Ref. SO877745.

Facilities & Access

Free Parking, Gift Shop, Moatside Tea Room (serving coffee, light lunches and afternoon teas, it is possible to visit the tea room and shop with out paying entrance fees).
Telephone: (01562) 777846
Fax: (01562) 777190
Email: harvingtonhall@btconnect.com

Sunday, 3 June 2012

Young Catholic Adults Douai Abbey Weekend 14-16 Sept 2012 - The Cottages Accomodation, What to Expect

Cottage

The Cottages




For Student and Youth Group & Family Retreats


  • The Cottages accommodate groups of up to 15 young persons in simple 'hostel' type rooms.
  • Self-catering facilities include a kitchen, dining room and scullery.
  • Two other rooms provide a lounge and chapel, and the whole building is centrally heated.
  • The facilities available include the Abbey Church which provides a peaceful, prayerful space for worship. Guests are free to join in all the community services and to enjoy the spacious Abbey grounds.
  • Special rate for families.
  • Lying deep in the Berkshire countryside overlooking the beautiful Kennet valley to the distant Hampshire downs, the Cottages provide an ideal place for a group retreat for all who seek the refreshment of peace and quiet.



Cottage Cottage






Contact the Cottage Manager - e-mail to: guestmaster@douaiabbey.org.uk youth

H/t to http://www.douaiabbey.org.uk.

Young Catholic Adults Douai 2012 - the Guest Facilities

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The Guest House




guestmaster
The St Benet Biscop Building, the first floor of which has been refurbished for guests .



Hospitality has been a special concern of monasteries from the earliest times. St Benedict teaches in the Rule "All guests are to be welcomed as Christ". At Douai we maintain this ancient tradition which is so vital today.

At present we have eleven fully en-suite rooms offering single and shared accommodation for guests in the Bl Hugh Faringdon and St Alban Roe building and eleven rooms in the refurbished St Benet Biscop building two of which are fully en-suite, the others are demi-en-suite.



Accommodation for Guests






Left: a guest at the desk in her room, with the Abbey Church outside. Right: a guest reading in one of the window alcoves.



Sitting room
One of the comments frequently made about Douai is that it offers an environment and atmosphere of peace and serenity, where the cares of daily life can be left behind. You would be most welcome to share that atmosphere.



The guest Refectory


Guests can eat formally in the refectory or on occasion informally outside. Our kitchen has been awarded five stars, the highest rating, by the West Berkshire Council Environmental Health Authority who described it as 'excellent'.
The guest court outside the refectory has become a popular area for guests to sit for conversation, or to read and meditate.




ref



ref
court



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Click for more pictures of the new guest accommodation.
To make a booking or for further information please e-mail to guestmaster@douaiabbey.org.uk





BL HUGH FARINGDON CONFERENCE CENTRE

For information about bringing a group to use the Conference Centre.


THE DOUAI COTTAGES A row of three farm labourers' cottages has been converted into one and sleeps 15. It is centrally heated and has a kitchen, scullery, dining room, lounge and chapel and provides simple 'hostel' style self-catering accommodation suitable for youth and student groups. Click for more information about the cottages.

LOCATION
Douai Abbey, situated on high ground in the Berkshire countryside overlooking the beautiful Kennet valley towards the distant Hampshire downs, is within easy reach of London, Reading, Oxford and many places of interest. It provides an ideal setting for quiet reflection, retreats and for conferences . Guests are welcome to join in all the community services in the Abbey Church and to enjoy the spacious monastery grounds, and the surrounding countryside and woods. Click for a Location Map. H/t to http://www.douaiabbey.org.uk.

Young Catholic Adults Retreat at Douai Abbey 2012 and the Schola Gregoriana of Cambridge

                                          Photo: Credit http://www.scholagregoriana.org/

The Schola Gregoriana of Cambridge will be assisting in the 2012 Young Catholic Adults weekend in Douai Abbey. They will be providing Gregorian Chant Workshops among other things.

The Schola website states that:- it was "founded in 1975 by Dr Mary Berry, a Cambridge musician and musicologist, in order to ensure that the chant should continue to be taught, and that all those who wished to sing and study this profoundly spiritual and ancient music should be able to do so. It became a registered charity in 1984.The Schola aims to promote the teaching and singing of Gregorian chant and, whenever possible, to foster its study and research."

For more details about the Schola  please see http://www.scholagregoriana.org/

Sunday, 25 March 2012

Young Catholic Adults National Weekend 14-16th Sept 2012




During the weekend of the 14-16 September 2012. Young Catholic Adults will be running a retreat at Douai Abbey, it will be led by Juventutem Ecclesiastical Assistant Fr de Malleray . The weekend will be full-board.



* YCA will be running the weekend with the Schola Gregoriana of Cambridge of Cambridge who will be holding Gregorian Chant workshops.
* There will be a Marian Procession, Rosaries, Sung/High Mass, Low Mass, Gregorian Chant Workshops Confession and socials
* Fr. de Malleray FSSP will preach the retreat, Masses will be in the Extraordinary form




Prices range from £5 to £51 per person per night . There are 3 options



THE MAIN GUEST HOUSE
Friday , registration from 4pm, to Sunday 11th September (full board)* or
Arrive Saturday morning till Sunday or day only
51 pounds full-board PER PERSON PER NIGHT
25 pounds for students/low waged/unwaged (or whatever you can afford) PER PERSON PER NIGHT



THE COTTAGES
£35 PER PERSON PER NIGHT (full board). Self catering £25 per person per night (reductions for students:- or whatever you can afford) .



SELF CATERING CAMPING
£5 PER PERSON PER NIGHT (or whatever you can afford - please bring your own tent and food ).



If you would like lunch on Sunday 11th then it will be an extra £7 each.


How to book - limited places so please reserve your place early (please note that you have to be 18 or over to come in this weekend).


To reserve your place FOR THE WEEKEND (no deposit needed if you are coming for the day on Saturday), please contact the Guestmaster direct and send a 20 pound deposit (NON RETURNABLE) to Brother Christopher Greener OSB, Douai Abbey, Upper Woolhampton, Reading, Berks. RG7 5TQ (please make any cheques payable to Douai Abbey). Please mention how long you wish to stay and any special diet.


For general enquiries about the weekend:- or any queries about the accommodation/location/lifts required please ring Damian Barker on 07908105787 or 01452 539503.

Monday, 12 March 2012

Cheltenham Young Catholic Adults - New Catechetical Series Launched



Cheltenham Young Catholic Adults continue to meet on the 2nd and 4th Tuesdays' of the month at St. Gregory’s Church in Cheltenham:- (2nd Tuesday – catechesis; 4th Tuesday – social). They will commence a catechetical course on the 10th Jan 2012 called the Parish Mission. Bottom of Form
From the Shrine of the Most Blessed Sacrament in Hanceville, AL, the Very Rev. William P. Casey, C.P.M. delivers Catholicism's timeless tenets. His messages on sin, reconciliation and redemption are hard- hitting... but full of hope for the sinner. This series is an effective tool for use in parish missions, retreats or private study. Please text 07908 105787 to be added onto the latest news list - people will get a text message with updates on the latest activities of this group twice a month.

Sunday, 22 May 2011

Cheltenham (Young) Catholic Adults

Cheltenham (Young) Catholic Adults will be meeting on Tuesday at 8:15pm outside St. Gregory's Church. We'll then be off to the Jolly Brewmaster in Leckhampton, all are warmly welcome.

Thursday, 20 May 2010

Young Catholic Adults Host International Juventutem Conference for the First Time!




The annual YCA weekend at Douai Abbey has always been aimed at the UK (or more precisely England and Wales). For the first time it has gone international! The annual Juventutem Conference is usually held in Switzerland; however, for 2010 it has moved to Berkshire in England.

During the weekend of the 10-12 September 2010. Young Catholic Adults will be running a Traditional Retreat at Douai Abbey, the retreat will be led by Juventutem Ecclesiastical Assistant Fr de Malleray .

The weekend will be full-board

Places are limited so please book early

* YCA will have half of the retreat centre to itself
* There will be a Marian Procession, Rosaries, Sung Mass, Low Mass, Confession and socials
* Fr. de Malleray FSSP head of Juventutem will preach the retreat, Masses will be in the Extraordinary form

Prices range from £5 (approx 6 Euros) to £51 (approx 60 Euros) per person per night .

See http://www.youngcatholicadults.co.uk/events.htm for more info:-


How to book - limited places so please reserve your place early
To reserve your place FOR THE WEEKEND (no deposit needed if you are coming for the day on Saturday 5th July), please a 20 pound deposit (NON RETURNABLE) to Damian Barker, Flat 5, 12 St. Catherine Street, Kingsholm, Gloucester, Glos. GL2 9DU (please make any cheques payable to Damian Barker). For enquiries ring 07908105787.
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