Thursday, 31 August 2017

Young Catholics are Turning in Droves to the Old Rite

Dominican Rite (Old Rite) Missa Cantata at the Annual 
Young Catholic Adult Weekend - Douai Abbey (UK)
From the Catholic Herald:-
"Young Catholics feel they have been denied their inheritance.
Where do they go from here? By Matthew Schmitz
Last week, in a speech to Italian liturgists, Pope Francis appeared to set in stone the liturgical changes that came at the time of Vatican II. “After this magisterium, after this long journey,” he said, “we can affirm with certainty and with magisterial authority that the liturgical reform is irreversible.” Liberal commentators celebrated his comments as a blow to the “the re-emergence of a certain neo-clericalism with its formalism” and rejoiced that the “restorationist movement in liturgy is being reversed”.
Liberals have reason to be glad: Francis has shown that he is sympathetic to their desire for a liturgy that feels more like a communal meal than an ancient sacrifice. But does Francis’s declaration mean that after millennia of development liturgical evolution has arrived at a final state and now must stop?
In a word, no. One might as well magisterially declare that spilt milk can’t be put back in the carton, or dogmatically define that Humpty Dumpty can’t be reassembled, as proclaim that liturgical reform cannot be reversed. It is like proudly stating that one cannot undo a grave mistake. The observation is incontestable, even if shame would be preferable to boasts. The question is not whether we can undo past blunders, but rather how to clean up the mess.
Francis’ remarks are yet another sign of his anxiety over the traditional direction in which young Catholics are carrying the Church. We have seen this before, in the stories he tells about young priests who shout at strangers and play dress-up, unlike the wise, old, compassionate (and liberal) monsignori. Francis has played variations of John Lennon’s Imagine: “We are grandparents called to dream and give our dream to today’s youth: they need it.” Maybe so, but the youth do not seem to want it.
As any young progressive or old traditionalist will tell you, age does not dictate whether one prefers dogma or liberty, ritual or casualness. Yet across much of the Catholic world, young traditionalists are competing against old progressives. Ironies abound, as youths who revere the venerable face off against elders who chase the up-to-date, and progressives who fear the future battle with traditionalists who loathe their immediate forebears.
Anyone who doubts the reality of the conflict should visit a monastery or convent, where young monastics will almost invariably be more traditional than their elders. In France, in 20 years’ time a majority of priests will celebrate exclusively the traditional Latin mass. Wherever one looks, the kids are Old Rite.

Sunday, 20 August 2017

Monday, 14 August 2017

Low Latin Mass for the Assumption of the BVM (15th Aug) at St. Gregory's Church Cheltenham is at 7pm - (Holy Day of Obligation in England and Wales)







At :-
St Gregory's Church, Cheltenham
10 St James Square, GL50 3 Cheltenham, Gloucestershire.
This will be the MAIN Parish Holy Day of Obligation Mass - "brick by brick. "

The Feast of the Assumption (15th August) is Tomorrow - in England and Wales this is a Holy Day of Obligation

 

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/

File:0260jfMaria_Assumpta_Seminary_Feast_

Assumption_Cabanatuan_Cityfvf_27.JPG

 

Holy Days of Obligation - A Description

"Sundays and holy days of obligation are days on which the faithful are obliged to participate in the Mass [... and to] abstain from those works and affairs which hinder the worship to be rendered to God, the joy proper to the Lord's day, or the suitable relaxation of mind and body (Code of Canon Law, Canon 1247).
Holy days mark days in the liturgical year of special importance or that merit special celebration. Worldwide, there is some variation in the dates of celebration of holy days as local Church authorities acknowledge patron saints or allow the celebration of holy days that occur during the week on the nearest Sunday. In England and Wales, according to a 1984 decision of the Bishops' Conference, holy days which fall on Saturday or Monday are in general transferred to the Sunday. From the first Sunday of Advent 2006 the feasts of The Epiphany of the Lord, The Ascension of the Lord and the Body and Blood of Christ (they mean Corpus Christi)   have also routinely been transferred to the neighbouring Sunday."

LMS Walsingham Pilgrimage 2017



The pilgrimage starts with registration in Ely on the evening of Thursday 24th August; and concludes with devotions in Walsingham on Sunday 27th August. There is an additional Mass for those staying Sunday night in the Slipper Chapel on Monday 28th August. This is the weekend of the August Bank Holiday.

Don’t miss your chance to take part in this unique event, by walking it, volunteering in it, or sponsoring the pilgrims.

•    Accompanied by priests, seminarians and religious.
•    High Mass (with deacon and subdeacon) on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday.
•    Sung Mass in the Medieval Slipper Chapel on Monday.
•    Specially created, re-usable Pilgrim’s Handbook with Mass texts, prayers, devotions, chants, and hymns for the road.
•    Proper evening meals created by our dedicated cooking team.
•    Support vehicles accompanying the Pilgrimage to carry heavy baggage and collect tired pilgrims.
•    Lifts, minibus or coach to and from Ely, Walsingham and London at the beginning and end of the Pilgrimage.
For full details, see the Pilgrimage Information Booklet
To volunteer as a driver or cook, email the Office by the end of June: info@lms.org.uk(link sends e-mail)
To sponsor the pilgrims, click here
To book as a walking pilgrim, go to the Booking page
Day Pilgrimage
If you are unable to undertake the Walking Pilgrimage for whatever reason but would like to make a day pilgrimage on the Sunday from London, then please see the Walsingham Day Pilgrimage page 
If you are not a member of the LMS, sign up today to save money on the pilgrimage and other events through the year, and support the work of the LMS.
24th August 2017 19:00   through   27th August 2017 15:00
Houghton St Giles
Little WalsinghamNR22 6AL
United Kingdom
Phone: 02074047284 
Phone: 02074047284 
Email: 

Wednesday, 9 August 2017

Cardinal Burke States That we Must Distinguish Between when the Pope Speaks "Personally" and when he is Speaking Authoritatively





From LifeSiteNews news:-

"LOUISVILLE, Kentucky, August 9, 2017 (LifeSiteNews) -- To treat every word uttered by the Pope as if it were official Church teaching would be to fall into an “idolatry of the papacy,” said Cardinal Raymond Burke in a recent address at a Catholic conference in Kentucky.

The Cardinal, who spoke at the July 22 “Church Teaches Forum” in Louisville, said that Catholics seeking to remain true to Christ and the Church he founded must learn to discern between the “words of the man who is Pope and the words of the Pope as Vicar of Christ on earth.”

“Pope Francis has chosen to speak often in his first body, the body of the man who is Pope. In fact, even in documents which, in the past, have represented more solemn teaching, he states clearly that he is not offering magisterial teaching but his own thinking,” the Cardinal said.

“But those who are accustomed to a different manner of Papal speaking want to make his every statement somehow part of the Magisterium. To do so is contrary to reason and to what the Church has always understood,” he continued.

“It is simply wrong and harmful to the Church to receive every declaration of the Holy Father as an expression of papal teaching or magisterium,” he added.

The Catholic Church holds that a pope teaches infallibly when “in virtue of his office...he proclaims by a definitive act a doctrine pertaining to faith or morals.” The Church also holds that when the pope in the “exercise of the ordinary Magisterium” proposes a teaching that “leads to better understanding of Revelation in matters of faith and morals” the faithful “are to adhere to it with religious assent.” These teachings are found in the Catechism of the Catholic Church.

Burke has previously called the Pope’s controversial 2016 Amoris Laetitia “not an act of the magisterium” but a “personal reflection of the Pope.” The Apostolic Exhortation has been interpreted by various bishops and cardinals as allowing civilly-divorced-and-remarried Catholics living in adultery to receive Holy Communion. Such an interpretation contradicts previous Catholic teaching.

Burke called it “absurd” for anyone to think that Pope Francis as Vicar of Christ on earth could officially “teach something which is not in accord with what his predecessors, for example Pope Benedict XVI and Pope Saint John Paul II, have solemnly taught.”

The Cardinal said that making the distinction between “words of the man who is Pope and the words of the Pope as Vicar of Christ on earth” is crucial for showing “ultimate respect” for the Petrine Office while staying true to the perennial teachings of the Catholic faith.

"Without the distinction, we would easily lose respect for the Papacy or be led to think that, if we do not agree with the personal opinions of the man who is Roman Pontiff, then we must break communion with the Church,” he said.

Any declaration of the Pope, said Burke, must be understood “within the context of the constant teaching and practice of the Church, lest confusion and division about the teaching and practice of the Church enter into her body to the great harm of souls and to the great harm of the evangelization of the world.”

Burke said that Catholics must be diligent not to be led astray by false teaching.

“The faithful are not free to follow theological opinions which contradict the doctrine contained in the Holy Scriptures and Sacred Tradition, and confirmed by the ordinary Magisterium, even if these opinions are finding a wide hearing in the Church and are not being corrected by the Church’s pastors as the pastors are obliged to do,” he said."

Beer named in honour of seminarians who were mistaken for stag party



From the Catholic Herald:-

A Welsh pub that initially turned away a group of seminarians after mistaking them for a stag party has named a beer in their honour.
The City Arms pub in Cardiff has rebranded “The Rev James,” a popular ale on its menu, the “Thirsty Priests”.
“We wanted to do something as a ‘thank you’ to the priests for taking the misunderstanding in such good spirits,” said Tim Lewis, PR manager for Brains, the pub’s owners, according to Wales Online.
With the added slogan “saving souls and satisfying thirsts”, the “Thirsty Priests” was added to the taps last weekend.
Celebrating the ordination of Father Peter McClaren, the group of seminarians dressed in their cassocks were at first refused service when they entered the City Arms on July 29.
“The staff thought they were a stag. We do have quite a few issues on the weekends with parties wearing fancy dress so it is our policy to turn them away,” said assistant manager Matt Morgan.
The manager overheard their prayers as they were leaving the bar, and invited them back for a round of beers on the house.
“By way of apology, he then very graciously provided us with a round of drinks, at which point the group decided to stay, provoking an outburst of applause from the locals casually enjoying a pint,” the seminarians said.
“Throughout the afternoon, the group continued to receive a warm welcome from the regulars but their curiosity did not cease, with many approaching us and asking us questions.”

Tuesday, 8 August 2017

7 Reasons to Pray the Rosary from St. Louis de Montfort


St. Louis de Montfort, the great Marianist saint, gives us 7 reasons to say the rosary:-

1) It gradually gives us a perfect knowledge of Jesus Christ
2) It purifies our souls, washing away sin
3) It gives us victory over all our enemies
4) It makes it easy for us to practice virtue
5) It sets us on fire with love of Our Blessed Lord
6) It enriches us with graces and merits
7) It supplies us with what is needed to pay all our debts to God and to our fellow men, and finally, it obtains all kinds of graces for us from Almighty God

Go and SAY YOUR ROSARY today!

Monday, 7 August 2017

Today is St. John Vianney's Feast day (1962 MR)


Prayer to St. Cajetan on His Feast Day


Glorious Saint Cajetan, acclaimed by
all people to be the father of providence
because you provide miraculous aid to
all in need, I stand here before you today,
asking that you present to the Lord our God
the requests that I confidently deposit
in your hands today.

May these graces that I now request
help me to always seek the Kingdom
of God and his Righteousness,
knowing that God — who dresses with
beauty the flowers of the field and
abundantly feeds the birds of the
sky — will give me all other
things. Amen.

Tuesday, 1 August 2017

August 2017 Cheltenham Young Catholic Adult Events




 Source:wikicommons

Wednesday 2nd Aug at 7pm - Low Mass, (EF) at St. Gregory's Church, Cheltenham (GL50 3PR), preceeded by a Rosary and confessions - the Rosary and the serving are organised by Cheltenham Young Catholic Adults. 

Tuesday 15th August - 7pm 
(EF) Low Mass of the Assumption of the B.V.M., - the Rosary and the serving are organised by Cheltenham Young Catholic Adults. HOLY DAY OF OBLIGATION!

There will be a summer break during August re: the main Chelt YCA social meeting - this will resume on the 3rd Saturday of the month in September 2017.

*Please note the Wednesday EF Mass is normally  on the first Wednesday of the month. 

Tags: Cheltenham Young Catholic Adults,  EF Mass, Social.
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